The best video camera you can buy in 2022

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Welcome to our guide to the world's best video cameras. From pocketable vlogging cameras to flagship powerhouses, we’ve tested all of the top video cameras you can buy in 2021. So whether you’re new to the world of videography or a seasoned filmmaker in search of an upgrade to take your cinematography to the next level, you’ll find your ideal video camera in the list below.

What’s the best video camera you can buy right now? The Sony A7S III is our current outright favorite. Masterful in low-light conditions, it can shoot stunning 4K footage at up to 120fps and Full HD at up to 240fps. It also features effective in-body image stabilization, outstanding autofocus capabilities and support for several picture profiles. It’s the ideal video-focused camera for most people, with a fully articulating touchscreen for framing versatility.

But that doesn’t mean it’s necessarily the best video camera for you. You might want something more affordable and compact, for example, which can slip into a pocket and shoot quick, sharp clips in an instant. If that’s the case for you, models like the DJI Pocket 2 and GoPro Hero 10 Black might be a better fit for your needs.

Alternatively, you might be looking for a camera that combines a compact form factor with impressive video skills at a good-value price. The Sony ZV-E10 does exactly that, even if it's sadly currently out of stock in most areas due to the global chip shortage. Equally, if cost isn't a constraint, you might want a model that can capture the sharpest video possible, in which case your best bet will be the Canon EOS R5 or Sony A1 – both of which can record 8K footage.

Whatever your expectations and budget, you’ll find your ideal camera ranked in our list below. Each model has been recommended because it offers a video-focused blend of design, features and skills. Some are big and bulky, others are small and portable. Some are affordable, while a few are very expensive. But they’re all built with video in mind and each should help you capture sharp footage in the right scenarios.

Not sure where to start when selecting your next video camera? At the bottom of this buying guide you’ll find useful advice and buying tips to help you choose.

The best video cameras in 2022:

Sony A7S III

(Image credit: Future)

This low-light master delivers stunning 4K footage

SPECIFICATIONS
Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: Full Frame
Resolution: 12.1MP
Lens: Sony E
Viewfinder: 9.44MP EVF
Monitor: 1.44m-dot articulating screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 10fps
Movies: 4K at 120fps
User level: Intermediate / expert
REASONS TO BUY
+
Superb low-light performance
+
Fully articulated touchscreen
+
No overheating problems
REASONS TO AVOID
-
No 6K or 8K
-
Low resolution for stills

The most video-focussed of all Sony’s A-series cameras, the Sony A7S III’s back-illuminated full-frame sensor delivers best-in-class 4K video in low-light situations. With 15 stops of dynamic range and an expandable ISO of 40 to 409,600, not to mention an effective in-body image stabilization system, it’s able to capture beautiful-looking videos in conditions that would thwart most of its competitors.

The sensor’s relatively low resolution of 12.1MP does rule out 6K and 8K recording (and limits detail for stills shooting), but the powerful Bionz XR processor allows 4K footage to be recorded at up to 120fps for smooth slow-motion playback; Full HD can be recorded at up to 240fps. The full-size HDMI output, class-leading autofocus, support for several picture profiles (including the popular S-Log) and ability to record long clips (30 minutes-plus) with no overheating issues are all signs of a serious video cameras.

In terms of usability and quality of life, the A7S III boasts many improvements over its predecessors. The touchscreen is now fully articulated and able to flip, boosted battery life lets you capture over 75 minutes of 4K footage on a single charge and the simplified UI is much more intuitive.

Panasonic Lumix S1H

(Image credit: TechRadar)

Netflix approves of this 6K beast – as do we

SPECIFICATIONS
Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: Full Frame
Resolution: 24.2MP
Lens: L-Mount
Viewfinder: 5.76m dots
Monitor: 2.33m-dot articulating screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 9fps
Movies: 6K at 24fps
User level: Intermediate / expert
REASONS TO BUY
+
Superb 6K 10-bit video capture
+
Strong low-light performance
+
Good IBIS
REASONS TO AVOID
-
No raw video capture
-
Bulky build
-
AF performance not the best
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The smallest, cheapest camera to be approved by Netflix for its original productions, the S1H is a hugely powerful full-frame model designed for demanding creators. While it can’t match the Sony A7S III for frame rate, it can record at 6K resolution at 24fps (as well as 4K at up to 60fps), giving it the edge when it comes to sheer detail.

In Panasonic’s V-Log or V-Gamut picture profiles, the S1H delivers 14 stops of dynamic range, while its All-I mode results in a staggering 400Mbps bitrate. The Dual Native ISO and large sensor size makes low-light shooting a breeze – although the Sony A7S III maintains an edge here. There’s superb in-body image stabilization to help out when shooting handheld, but do be aware that the S1H is larger and heavier than many of its contemporaries, so long handheld sessions aren’t advised.

Autofocus is a mixed bag: in good lighting the Depth From Defocus (DFD) system works well, but in dimmer conditions it feels a little slow. Still, if you can live with its minor quirks, the S1H is capable of producing stunningly sharp and detail-rich footage.

Fujifilm X-T4

(Image credit: Future)

The best APS-C camera around – and a very solid video option

SPECIFICATIONS
Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: APS-C
Resolution: 26.1MP
Lens: X mount
Viewfinder: 3.69m dots
Monitor: 1.62m-dot articulating screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 15fps
Movies: 4K at 60fps
User level: Intermediate
REASONS TO BUY
+
Excellent APS-C sensor
+
5-axis in-body stabilization
+
Great build quality and battery life
REASONS TO AVOID
-
No headphone jack
-
Handgrip a little small
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APS-C sensors might hold less of a cachet than their larger full-frame cousins, but the image quality of Fujifilm’s X-series cameras is proof positive that they can more than deliver the goods – and in a more compact, lightweight body than most full-frame models too. For us, the X-T4 is not only the best X-series model but the best APS-C camera on the market.

This hybrid excels at both stills photography and video, with its flip-out touchscreen, 5-axis IBIS, compelling color science, and ability to shoot 10-bit 4K footage at up to 60fps (or Full HD footage at up to 240fps) making it a great tool for both vlogging and 'serious' filmmaking. The autofocus system can track both eyes and faces, too – although its performance varies depending on the lens attached, and Sony’s AF setup is superior.

That being said, the X-T4 is a flexible, well-built all-rounder with performance that’ll suit both photographers and videographers.

Canon EOS R5

(Image credit: Future)

Canon’s best ever stills camera can also impress with video

SPECIFICATIONS
Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: Full Frame
Resolution: 45MP
Lens: RF mount
Viewfinder: 5.76m dots
Monitor: 2.1m-dot articulating screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 20fps
Movies: 8K at 30fps
User level: Intermediate / Expert
REASONS TO BUY
+
Fantastic AF
+
Effective IBIS
+
Stellar stills performance
REASONS TO AVOID
-
Recording limits due to overheating
-
Expensive
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Canon’s prosumer mirrorless camera is hugely powerful. With a 45MP full-frame sensor, supremely sticky autofocus, solid IBIS, great battery life and the ability to shoot continuously at 20fps, we think the EOS R5 is the best camera stills Canon has ever made.

For video shooters, an out-and-out recommendation is a little trickier. For starters, while the R5 offers a lot of higher-end video modes (8K ALL-I or RAW, 4K at 120fps, 10-bit 4K HEVC), they require an expensive CFexpress card. The more intensive video modes also cause the camera to overheat, not only limiting recording time but requiring a long cool-down before you can record again.

If you can work within these limits, you’ll find the R5’s video quality to be excellent: pin-sharp with bags of flexibility when it comes to colour grading. If the price puts you off, consider sister camera the Canon EOS R6, which has a 20.6MP sensor and is limited to 4K video, but costs considerably less.

Nikon Z6 II

(Image credit: Future)

The all-rounder offers great handling and build quality

SPECIFICATIONS
Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: Full Frame
Resolution: 24.5MP
Lens: Z mount
Viewfinder: 3.69m dots
Monitor: 2.1m-dot tilting screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 14fps
Movies: 4K at 60fps
User level: Intermediate
REASONS TO BUY
+
Best-in-class build quality
+
Excellent image quality
+
5-axis IBIS
REASONS TO AVOID
-
Screen is tilt only
-
No internal 10-bit recording
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This is the second edition of Nikon’s full-frame mirrorless model, and the company has both worked out some of the original’s kinks and made modest improvements in key areas. The result is a versatile camera that does well with both stills and video, although users should note that video performance here is pretty much identical to the original Z6 (which you should be able to pick up for a lot less).

The Z6 II’s handling and build quality are superb, making it a joy to use, although videographers may well bemoan the fact that the screen just tilts rather than being fully articulated. The camera body is quite lightweight for its specs, but rugged and weatherproofed, making it a good choice for anyone planning long shoots out and about.

Following a firmware update, 4K video can be recorded at up to 60fps, while Full HD can be recorded at up to 120fps for slow-motion playback. 10-bit HLG footage can be recorded too, but only externally – so bear that in mind if you want to record in the best quality.

Sony A1

(Image credit: Future)

A powerhouse that pushes the boundaries – at a price

SPECIFICATIONS
Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: Full Frame
Resolution: 50.1MP
Lens: E mount
Viewfinder: 9.44m dots
Monitor: 1.44m-dot tilting screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 30fps
Movies: 8K at 30fps
User level: Expert
REASONS TO BUY
+
Wealth of video options
+
Excellent image quality
+
Superb AF system
REASONS TO AVOID
-
Extremely pricey
-
Non-articulated screen
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A rare pairing of speed and resolution, Sony’s flagship camera comes with a price to match its ambition. It wants to be the best consumer camera in the world, quite frankly – and it might well be, but you’ll need to part with what might be several months’ salary to own one.

Able to record 8K video at 30fps, 4K at 120fps and Full HD at 240fps, with a huge host of other options like 10-bit color depth, S-Log and S-Cinetone available, this is a videographer’s dream. It can even output 16-bit raw footage to an external recorder, should 10-bit be insufficient for your requirements. Annoyingly, the screen merely tilts rather than faces all directions, while the menu system feels confusingly labyrinthine.

With an imperious autofocus system, effective IBIS and the sharpest OLED viewfinder on the market, the A1 is also a world-class stills camera able to shoot continuously at 30fps. If you’re just shooting video, the Sony A7S III is a much cheaper and almost-as-effective alternative.

Panasonic GH5 Mark II vlogging camera

(Image credit: Future)

A perfect entry-point into serious video creation

SPECIFICATIONS
Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: Micro Four Thirds
Resolution: 20.3MP
Lens: Micro Four-Thirds
Viewfinder: 3.68m dots
Monitor: 1.84m-dot articulated screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 12fps
Movies: 4K at 60fps
User level: Beginner/intermediate
REASONS TO BUY
+
Strong all-round video quality
+
Compact, lightweight and sturdy
+
Built-in wireless live streaming
REASONS TO AVOID
-
Small sensor size
-
DFD AF isn’t the most reliable
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The original Panasonic GH5 was possibly the first mirrorless camera that did both 4K video and stills photography well, but its successor arrives at a time when plenty of rival models share that trait – and doesn’t offer much in the way of an upgrade.

The Mark II stands out by virtue of its built-in wireless live streaming capabilities, which at the time of writing you won’t find on any other mirrorless camera, but its general video skills remain strong: 10-bit 4:2:2 footage can be recorded internally or externally, there’s a wide variety of frame rate options and various anamorphic video resolutions supported and Panasonic’s flat V-Log profile gives you 12 stops of dynamic range to play with in post-production.

That the GH5 Mark II includes all this in a compact, lightweight and weatherproof body with effective IBIS makes it all the more impressive. Its sensor may be small (which does limit its low-light capabilities), but this is a mighty video camera. Bear in mind, though, that the Panasonic GH6 is also coming later this year.

Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K Pro

(Image credit: Future)

A professional workhorse at a great price

SPECIFICATIONS
Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: APS-C
Resolution: 21.2MP
Lens: Canon EF
Viewfinder: 3.68m dots
Monitor: Full HD tilt screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: n/a
Movies: 6K at 60fps
User level: Expert
REASONS TO BUY
+
Cheap for a professional cinema camera
+
Built-in ND filters
+
Lightweight build
REASONS TO AVOID
-
Not for novices
-
No IBIS
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It may not actually fit in your pocket, but Blackmagic Design’s Pocket Cinema Camera 6K Pro does put real filmmaking power in a small, lightweight and relatively affordable package. 

Don’t expect the luxurious quality-of-life features you’d get with a mirrorless model from one of the big names: there’s no IBIS here, the autofocus moves like treacle (forget about tracking AF) and stills capabilities are essentially non-existent. The viewfinder is an optional add-on. That’s because everything’s been stripped back in favor of pro-quality performance, and because the camera is aimed at people who make films and have the necessary gear or knowhow to capture steady shots and pull focus properly.

Image quality is stupendous (12-bit raw or ProRes footage can be recorded), the popular Canon EF lens mount is supported and there are three built-in ND filters to aid filming in tricky lighting conditions, while the mini-XLR inputs mean high-quality audio recording is simple.

The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K on a tripod

(Image credit: Future)

A great cinema camera for under a grand

SPECIFICATIONS
Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: Four-Thirds
Resolution: 8MP
Lens: Micro Four-Thirds
Viewfinder: n/a
Monitor: Full HD fixed screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: n/a
Movies: 4K at 60fps
User level: Expert
REASONS TO BUY
+
Professional-level video standards
+
Great price
+
Small and light
REASONS TO AVOID
-
Light on features
-
No articulating screen
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Don’t let the plasticky utilitarian design or lack of 'mod cons' like in-body image stabilization, a viewfinder or tracking autofocus fool you: the Pocket Cinema Camera 4K is a pro-level piece of filmmaking gear with an affordable price tag.

With a wide range of connectivity (including full-size HDMI, mini-XLR and a DC power connector), a huge (and sadly non-articulated or tilting) 16:9 touchscreen and the ability to shoot ProRes or raw footage in a variety of resolutions and frame rates, this has almost everything a serious videographer needs. Just add a lens (it uses the same MFT mount as Panasonic and Olympus cameras) and some fast storage and you’re good to go.

It’s not perfect – the stills performance is rudimentary and the battery life is nothing to get excited about – but the image quality alone makes Blackmagic’s entry-level option a better video performer than most high-end mirrorless models.

The front of the Sony ZV-E10 showing its image sensor

(Image credit: Future)

A compact 4K vlogging cam with interchangeable lenses

SPECIFICATIONS
Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: APS-C
Resolution: 24.2MP
Lens: Sony E
Viewfinder: N/A
Monitor: 3-inch fully articulating touchscreen, 921K dots
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 11fps
Movies: 4K at 30fps
User level: Beginner / enthusiast
REASONS TO BUY
+
Compact and lightweight
+
Fully articulating screen
REASONS TO AVOID
-
Rolling shutter when panning
-
No 4K/60p video mode
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Want a capable video tool that fits in your pocket? Sony’s ZV-E10 isn’t perfect, but it’s an impressive portable package for videographers. Despite its compact, lightweight build, the ZV-E10 packs a 24MP APS-C sensor that can shoot sharp 4K footage (albeit limited to 30fps) and Full HD slow-mo at up to 120fps. Mic-in and headphone ports give welcome audio flexibility, while the Multi-Interface hot shoe mount means you can readily accessorize your setup. 

A fully articulating touchscreen also makes framing a cinch, and UVC/UAC computer connectivity unlocks easy live-streaming. Besides the lack of a 4K/60p setting, its major limitation is rolling shutter when panning. This jelly effect puts paid to quick pans, which will discourage run-and-gun recorders. If you can live with this, Sony’s ZV-E10 remains an affordable video-focused hybrid – if you can find it in stock.

Panasonic Lumix S5

(Image credit: Future)

Panasonic’s slimmed-down full-frame is a strong all-rounder

SPECIFICATIONS
Type: Mirrorless
Sensor Size: Full-Frame
Resolution: 24.2MP
Lens: L mount
Viewfinder: 2.36m-dot EVF
Monitor: 1.84m-dot articulated screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 7fps
Movies: 4K at 60fps
User level: Intermediate / Expert
REASONS TO BUY
+
Small for a full-frame camera
+
Wide range of video options
REASONS TO AVOID
-
No full-size HDMI output
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Panasonic’s smallest and lightest full-frame camera, the Lumix S5 looks more akin to a Micro Four Thirds model than the beefy Lumix S1 with which it shares a sensor. The portability makes it a great option for run-and-gun filming (provided you stick with smaller, lighter L lenses), and the 5-axis IBIS comes in handy here too.

Video users have access to a vast array of options, resolutions and frame rates, including 4K 10-bit internal recording and V-Log (with its 14 stops of dynamic range). The fully articulated screen and option to shoot uncropped 4K at 30fps are welcome touches.

On the downside, the HDMI output is of the micro variety and the DFD autofocus setup isn’t the quickest, but neither feels like a dealbreaker.

The GoPro Hero 10 Black action camera sitting on a wooden bench

(Image credit: Future)

A rugged 5K powerhouse in your pocket

SPECIFICATIONS
Type: Action
Sensor Size: 1/2.3-inch
Resolution: 23.6MP
Lens: Fixed
Viewfinder: N/A
Monitor: 2.27-inch touchscreen (rear), 1.4-inch LCD (front)
Maximum continuous shooting speed: 30fps
Movies: 5.3K at 60fps
User level: Beginner
REASONS TO BUY
+
Slicker performance all round
+
Class-leading stabilization
REASONS TO AVOID
-
Same small sensor as before
-
Still not the best in low light
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Built around the same 23MP 1/2.3-inch sensor as its predecessor, the GoPro Hero 10 Black doesn’t reinvent the action cam. Instead, it refines the entire package to deliver GoPro’s most polished model to date. Much more user friendly, its interface and menus are now snappier to navigate using the rear touchscreen. A beefy GP2 chip also powers a raft of improvements, including a new 4K/120p slow-mo mode, as well as the option to shoot 5K at 60fps. 

Image quality is marginally better, although it tends to retain that wide-angle look. The headline change is horizon-leveling, which can now keep footage steady even if you tilt to 45 degrees. While it’s not a game-changing upgrade from the Hero 9 Black, the latest GoPro is the best one yet and a compact yet truly versatile video camera for use in all conditions.

DJI Pocket 2

(Image credit: Future)

12. DJI Pocket 2

A rock-steady vlogging camera

SPECIFICATIONS
Type: Gimbal camera
Sensor Size: 1/1.7in
Resolution: 64MP
Lens: fixed 20mm equivalent
Viewfinder: n/a
Monitor: 1in screen
Maximum continuous shooting speed: n/a
Movies: 4K at 60fps
User level: Beginner
REASONS TO BUY
+
Truly pocket-sized
+
Excellent gimbal stabilization
REASONS TO AVOID
-
Poor low-light performance
-
Can get hot when filming 4K
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Yes, the small smartphone-style sensor of DJI’s tiny Pocket 2 handheld camera does limit its video capabilities somewhat, especially compared to some of the premium mirrorless cameras mentioned elsewhere in this guide. It’s poor in low-light conditions and its stills performance is rudimentary at best.

But its small size means you can take it anywhere, and the mechanical 3-axis stabilization that comes from its gimbal lends its videos the air of a Steadicam shot. For vloggers this is brilliant stuff, but even more demanding videographers can get good results due to its 4K capabilities and D-Cinelike color profile.

Of course, you can forget about swapping lenses and other such luxuries, but live within its limits and the Pocket 2 can be a powerful tool.

Insta360 One X2

(Image credit: Future)

13. Insta360 One X2

A top option for shooting 360 video on the go

SPECIFICATIONS
Type: Compact
Sensor Size: 1/2.3-inch
Resolution: 18.4MP
Lens: f/2.0, 7.2mm equivalent
Viewfinder: N/A
Monitor: 1.33in touchscreen LCD
Maximum continuous shooting speed: Sets of 10
Movies: 5.7K at 30fps
User level: Beginner / Enthusiast
REASONS TO BUY
+
Excellent video stabilization
+
Now fully waterproof
REASONS TO AVOID
-
Non-360 cams offer superior quality
-
Image quality not hugely improved
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With useful features, accessible software and swooping video effects, the Insta360 One X was our favorite camera for capturing 360 content. The X2 makes modest but meaningful tweaks to that package. With a similar, slightly larger pill-shaped design, it uses the same sensor to shoot 5.7K video. The upgrades include a small but handy porthole touchscreen to preview your shots, plus IPX8 water-resistance, which lets you shoot underwater without a case (down to 10 meters). 

Battery life is better at 80 minutes, while new shooting modes unlock enhanced functionality: Steady Cam Mode lets you use one of the two lenses as a standard action cam, while the app’s Auto Frame tool analyzes 360 footage and suggests highlights to include in your final edit. While image resolution is the same, the X2 benefits from processing refinements, including in-camera color rendering, improved low-light performance and less obvious stitch lines. Cropping a 1080p frame from 5.7K 360 footage won’t produce video to trouble the best action cams, but it does offer unrivaled versatility, allowing you to reframe on any subject after the fact. 

Alternatively...

DJI Air 2S vs Mavic 2 Pro

(Image credit: Future)

A fine way to (quite literally) take your videos up a level

SPECIFICATIONS
Weight: 595g
Controller: Yes
Camera resolution: 20MP
Flight time: 31 minutes
Range: 8km-12km
REASONS TO BUY
+
Large 1-Inch sensor
+
Small and lightweight
REASONS TO AVOID
-
No adjustable aperture
-
Controller isn’t foldable
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DJI’s compact, versatile drone is a fantastic flying camera, capable of capturing excellent quality video thanks to its 1in 20MP sensor and gimbal. Resolution goes up to 5.7K at 30fps, but 4K videos can be recorded at a smoother 60fps and Full HD footage at an even silkier 120fps. Videos look striking straight out of the camera, but can be recorded in 10-bit and/or the D-Cinelike color profile if you want maximum editing scope in post-production.

The fixed f/2.8 aperture might cause some issues in bright conditions, but these can be mitigated with ND filters, while the copious safety features, long battery life and powerful wind resistance make the drone a pleasure to fly. 


What’s the best video camera for those on a budget?

While the very best, cutting-edge video cameras will inevitably cost a lot of money, you don’t need to blow thousands on something to shoot excellent footage. There are plenty of affordable camera models available which allow you to record sharp, stable video in a range of scenarios.

If you’re looking for an accessible camera that can capture steady shots on the go, something like the DJI Pocket 2 could be just what you need. Small enough to slip in your pocket, its three-axis gimbal can capture shake-free 4K shots while you walk. Its sensor size isn’t the biggest, but you get a lot for your money – including subject tracking with the motorized head. For solo vloggers on a budget, it’s well worth considering.

Alternatively, a rugged action cam like the GoPro Hero 10 Black puts a lot of video performance in a small, sturdy and relatively affordable package. While it can’t capture the same cinematic depth of field effects you’d get from a more expensive model, it can record rock-steady results in sharp, bright 5.3K. It can also go anywhere, connect readily to your smartphone for live streaming and produce creative results thanks to its range of preset shooting modes.

Looking for a little more manual control? Sony’s ZV-E10 combines a compact form factor with plenty of video versatility, at a very fair price. 4K frame rates are limited to 30fps and there is an issue with rolling shutter when panning. But it also features a fully-articulating touchscreen, ports for external audio gear and the option to swap lenses to suit the scenario.

If your budget can stretch a little further, the Panasonic GH5 Mark II offers outstanding value. It builds on what was already one of the best mirrorless cameras for shooting 4K content, offering a wide variety of 4K frame rates, resolutions and color profiles in a compact, lightweight body. What really gives it an edge is the inclusion of built-in wireless live streaming skills. It can send footage in real-time to the likes of YouTube, without any additional kit, which makes it a brilliantly accessible option for streamers.

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